Wednesday, December 18, 2013

If your cookies expand too much, the problem is too much heat—but not at the baking stage, at the mixing stage: Your butter is too warm.The solution: Keep your butter cool, right until baking. For cookies, you want butter well below room temperature; between 50° and 65° is optimal. Cut the butter into chunks, and let it stand at room temperature to soften (don't microwave). If the butter is still cold to the touch but spreadable, you can start creaming.

Mustard-Maple Glazed Chicken
Mustard-Maple Glazed Chicken

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Tri-Layered Vegetable Kugel – Kosher Recipes & Cooking
Tri-Layered Vegetable Kugel – Kosher Recipes & Cooking

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PARMESAN GARLIC QUINOA (you'll never eat mac & cheese again!)
PARMESAN GARLIC QUINOA (you'll never eat mac & cheese again!)

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Southwest roll-ups-freezer meal from money-saving mom
Southwest roll-ups-freezer meal from money-saving mom

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If your cookies expand too much, the problem is too much heat—but not at the baking stage, at the mixing stage: Your butter is too warm.The solution: Keep your butter cool, right until baking. For cookies, you want butter well below room temperature; between 50° and 65° is optimal. Cut the butter into chunks, and let it stand at room temperature to soften (don't microwave). If the butter is still cold to the touch but spreadable, you can start creaming.
If your cookies expand too much, the problem is too much heat—but not at the baking stage, at the mixing stage: Your butter is too warm.The solution: Keep your butter cool, right until baking. For cookies, you want butter well below room temperature; between 50° and 65° is optimal. Cut the butter into chunks, and let it stand at room temperature to soften (don't microwave). If the butter is still cold to the touch but spreadable, you can start creaming.

Download whole gallery

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